Half Iron, Full Send

Hello and welcome to the second installment of “races I did in Tennessee because NC 70.3 was canceled” (see first installment here).

I was excited to make the trek back to Tennessee with both current and former teammates to race Chattanooga 70.3. I had a pretty strong build leading up to this race, featuring memorable workouts such as 3×20 min at threshold on the bike and an 18 mile long run (“Hey coach, people keep asking me if I’m training for a marathon…”). Still, I didn’t go into this race feeling totally confident in myself – lots of ups and downs happen in any training cycle and leave little seeds of doubt. But regardless, I approached the race with a positive attitude and a plan to get out there and just do my best, whatever that might be on the day.

My race plan was pretty simple: “have fun, go fast, don’t die.”

On race morning, we arrived to transition early to set up our gear, then boarded buses to take us to the swim start. With over an hour to kill before the start of the race, I took in some caffeine, got in a warmup jog, liberally applied lubricant all over my body, and got into my wetsuit before lining up for the rolling start. My teammates and I seeded ourselves towards the front, and even then it took over 20 minutes before it was finally our turn to descend the ramp and jump off the dock into the Tennessee River.

In the lead up to this race, whenever I’d have a bad training day in the pool, I’d remind myself that this swim course would be mostly downstream – so hey, swimming would barely matter, right? That turned out to be the case even more than I could have imagined! On race morning, the current was deemed too strong for us lowly age groupers, so following the pro wave the buoys were towed in and the upstream portion of the swim was cut out. That lead to an extra short, extra fast swim. Despite not having been able to warm up, I felt pretty good in the water. The rolling start meant it wasn’t too crowded, and I held a good steady effort while hopping onto anyone’s feet to draft whenever I had the opportunity. In just over 1300yds and just under 17 mins, we were already exiting the swim – I wasn’t kidding when I said short and fast!

I made the long run up to transition with a pitstop at the wetsuit strippers, and managed to totally run right past my bike. After a brief moment of confusion, I located my trusty steed and soon after we were on our way along the bike course.

The course starts out going through town before it really opens up into some nicer rolling countryside. It was definitely a little bumpy at times, with a fair number of railroad crossings (did someone say “Chattanooga Choo Choo?”) – I was grateful my water bottles stayed put the whole way since many others were not so fortunate. The first half is predominantly uphill, so I just tried to keep a steady, controlled effort and not burn out too early. The second half of the course felt like a reward, featuring some really lovely winding downhills that were just a treat to ride. When I started to get inside my head about hitting specific power targets, I just let those thoughts go and went by feel, which worked out for me – even with lower-than-planned watts, I came in with a faster split than I had anticipated.

I hopped off the bike and ran into transition feeling pretty solid, and managed to find my rack spot on the first try this time. At this point in the race, there was just one thing left to do – run 13.1 miles. Just 13.1 miles under the hot, Tennessee sun.

Despite my plan to take the run out relaxed and ease into it, the excitement of the crowd and the day lead me to breeze through the first few miles under my goal pace. That magic started to fade though, and I was left to face the heat, the hills, and the heaviness in my legs. It was a lot of grit that took me through the rest of that run course, desperately trying to keep myself moving when all I wanted to do was to stop or slow down. I was taking water, cold sponges, and ice at every aid station I could (special shoutout to the volunteer who dumped ice straight down into my sports bra). Miles 10-12 were a true ride on the struggle bus, but I did manage to find some fire within for a strong final mile and a big kick down the chute to the finish.

After catching my breath, walking around a bit, and taking advantage of an amazing free post-race massage, I picked up my phone and saw a slew of messages from friends who had been tracking me, congratulating me on my race. “TOP 10 OVERALL!!!!!” they said, and I was confused, thinking there was no way that could be right. Because of the rolling start, I hadn’t any idea where I was placed relative to my competitors over the course of the race. But despite my initial disbelief, my friends were correct – I finished 8th amateur female overall, and second in my F24-29 age group.

Other highlights of the day included strong finishes by my TMS IOS teammates Sloane and Tom and the solid pound of loaded french fries that I consumed post-race.

Until next time, Tennessee! 🤙


Swim – 16:48
T1 – 3:33
Bike – 2:33:46 (22.2 mph)
T2 – 2:17
Run – 1:36:06
Total – 4:32:30

Time Trials and Tribulations

I sat in the middle of the crosswalk, holding the back of my head, confused as to what just happened. People around me were talking but I couldn’t pay attention to what anyone was saying. As I saw blood now streaming onto my leg from the back of my head, my first thought was: “I guess I’m not going to get to run tonight”.

Minutes before, fresh off my muscle physiology exam, I was walking back to my car to go home for an evening run. I was excited. It was a nice evening, I finished my last class of my PhD program, and I wanted to go enjoy the nice weather while pushing some intervals track. As I was crossing the most dangerous intersection in Greensboro (in the crosswalk, with the “walk” light on), a vehicle struck me from my back right, sending me up and over the front corner of their car. I barely remember getting hit, but distinctly remember landing almost exclusively on my sacrum, catching a little bit of the weight with my elbows, and whipping the rest of my momentum through my head onto the asphalt.

Since there has not yet been a settlement, I will not go into much more detail. I’m about a week after the accident and still dealing with concussion symptoms and a broken sacrum. Needless to day, I’m not racing for a bit. Hell, I still can’t really bend over much.

I didn’t want to have to write another blog about being injured. In fact, it was supposed to be some triumph story from the last injury blog. Well, okay, I actually did have a good build from my last injury, which is the good part. The bad part is I only really got to race one triathlon since that accident.

But rather than an injury blog about ‘moving forward’, I’ll still do a short recap blog.  During major injuries, I find it is better to reflect on past experiences for confidence, rather than the uncertain future.

After my injury last year, I put in a ton of hours on the indoor trainer. I did a lot of Zwift racing, intense workouts, and recovery rides all from my home. It wasn’t what I pictured as glorious, but in the early stages of my recovery, it was really helpful to have my space. I was strong. I set a new FTP by a sizeable margin, even at a lighter weight than I used to be. Once I introduced running back, my focus was set on speed, and it sure came easier than I thought.

I did the Frosty 50k relay with a fast group of guys (12.5k each), and even managed to PR my 10k time and sustain it the rest of the 2.5km. I had a bit of plantar fasciitis after this race, but I was able to run through most of it. I shifted focus back to cycling for a bit and did a number of criteriums (just to accumulate race experience and get out of Cat 5 – not really to win), but still managed to be competitive in a number of them.

In April, I did the Riverlights TT triathlon in Wilmington. It was a 20km bike TT, a 1000m swim tt, and a 5km run TT, all separated by ~40 min. I loved this format. I am a big fan of ‘non-traditional’ multisport races – they allow you to try new things and come up with new strategies, rather than the standard formulas.

Of the triathletes, I had the fastest bike time, which is rare for me (one guy beat me but only did the bike, not the triathlon). I had been aggressive on the bike. I had sprinted out of every corner and really didn’t let off. I was worried about how that would affect my swim and run, but I just wanted to focus on one thing at a time.

They got to the swim start before I even had a chance to warm up so I went in “cold”. My legs were already vaguely wanting to cramp but I just sucked it up and went hard. I definitely held my own, only really losing time to the overall winner, who is a fantastic swimmer. Otherwise I had a fairly good swim, especially for my training.

My legs getting out felt exceptionally bad but I didn’t have much choice. They got started with the 5k a little early too, so I only got a 2 minute warmup and a couple of strides, which felt… bad. I just decided to give it whatever I had left. I caught and passed the race leader, but due to the timing system, I didn’t know how much of a gap he had on me in the standings. I knew a couple of guys were close to me in time, and they were literally right behind me from the start of the 5K. One of the guys (who usually beats me) made an early pass at the one mile mark and started stringing the race out. I could tell I overcooked the first mile at ~5:30, but I thought “whatever, just keep going as hard as you can in each moment until you get to the finish”. It was a reckless mentality but it paid off. I finished the 5K in 18:08 [on gravel]. Not my fastest 5K, but faster than I thought given the efforts I put in already.

Nobody knew what the final placings were, so there was about 10 minutes of us speculating and chatting at the end of the race. Then someone came and pointed “1, 2, and 3” at people around me, but not me. I was a little bummed – I felt suspiciously good. Then I found out they had trouble with my timing chip. Once they correctly located my chip number (which got mixed up pre-race), my name popped up in 2nd place. I was very happy about that. It felt like things were going right. I even pushed myself past what I thought was capable given my ‘untested’ fitness. I mean, I hardly raced last year so it had been quite awhile!

That’s what makes my current situation tough. I knew I was fit and I was ready to use that fitness for some races! I put in months of long, hard work. At the time, I enjoyed the challenge of building myself back, but it’s more fun to be fit. And now, I sit here, knowing that I’ll have to do it again. I know I can do it again, but this time seems different; partially because I just did it and I know how hard it will be, and partially because this time isn’t my fault – I went from a great fitness level to hospitalized all because of an inattentive driver.

I plan on posting again by the end of the year to hopefully have the real triumph story, but as of now, the path there is unclear. It’s hard to know exactly how long it will take before I can even think about training again, but I know it’s out there. Call it resiliency or call it stubborn, I will keep fighting my way back.