It’s a Journey

A journey is the act of travelling from one place to another. That can apply to many facets of life from the big metaphorical journey right down to the journey from Swim to Bike to Run and Finish. One of the things I love about volunteering for races at packet pickup is meeting new triathletes at the culmination of their journey for their first race. It wasn’t really that long ago that I was there myself. Despite the number of races in a season or many I’ve done over time, I still get the nerves and excited anticipation before the start of the swim. There are so many ways to mix it up in the season too– sprint/olympic/half (not full for me, ha!), pool/lake/ocean swim, flat/hilly course, tried-n-true/new-n-different… Everybody’s journey is different and I love seeing that despite those differences, we all come together on those race mornings to race our hearts out.

The motivation of having those dates on the calendar is a huge push too. Last year I had a baby and the big challenge this year was working in training despite the hectic family life with 3 kids, husband, a home, and part-time work to hold up. It didn’t always work. It felt good when it did. Some seasons are better than others and we are all human. Fellow teammates’ and athletes’ stories of the trials they have overcome are heartening and inspiring. I draw from those when talking myself into and through the tough times. I also remind myself that every stage of life is so different from the next. My first half-iron feels like it was ages ago but really it’s only been a few years! So much has changed. Maybe I need to give myself the same advice I pass on to those nervous first-race athletes. Have fun and don’t be too hard on yourself. At the end of the day, it’s a great accomplishment no matter what.

There’s that quote about ‘ it’s not the destination but the journey.’ In my experience, that finish line is great but pales in comparison to all that happens along the way. I’ve learned a lot about myself. I could get all sappy and deep here but the gist is how much more of a journey I’ve experienced through the triathlon part of my life than just training for a race and for that I’m forever grateful. Looking forward to seeing everyone on the course!

2018 Santa Rosa 70.3

In July, I completed a 70.3 in Santa Rosa, California. Well, it was actually a 69.1 race since they cancelled the swim. Short story, I was bummed about the swim cancellation and decided to just have fun with the day, enjoy the beautiful wine country scenery and drink all of the wine after the race. For the long story, continue reading.

The backstory: Santa Rosa was my goal race for the summer. It was also an excuse to spend some quality time with my triathlon bff and a few other friends on a much need adult vacation exploring wine country and Lake Tahoe. Thanks to my wonderful husband (aka Super Dad) for making that happen! About six weeks leading up to the race, I had some hamstring/hip flexor tightness. I ended up pushing through a few track workouts I probably should have not pushed through. Over the next few weeks, the tightness became progressively worse until I could barely push the gas pedal driving to work, much less run well. Also, I thought it would be great idea to do the Triangle Sprint, two week before the race, and “take it easy on the run”. Yeah, sure. After Triangle, I was in a lot of pain and did very little running, dry needling, started PT, massage, and stretching. Fast forward to the race.

The race is a point to point, which means there are lot of logistical things to tackle. One thing I had not thought through was how to transport my bike from athlete’s village in downtown Santa Rosa to T1 at Lake Sonoma 56 miles away. We rented the smallest possible rental car to save money. Luckily, TriBike Transport was shuttling bikes to the lake for a small fee of $40..ugh. That’s on top of the $350 I already paid them to ship it there. Anyway, the day before the race was spent doing all the logistical pre-race stuff, which included a swim in the beautiful Lake Sonoma. The water was a nice 74 degrees (the air not so much..107 degrees), perfectly calm and crystal clear. I love swimming and I was very excited to swim in this lake. Unfortunately, unseasonably warm afternoons and cool mornings at the lake leads to fog.

On race morning the visibility was very poor which forced a delayed start of the race from 6:30 am to 7:45 am. At 7:15 am, the race director announced the swim was cancelled and a time trial bike start would be used. I had no idea what that meant. I had also spent the last hour nervously eating all of my extra snacks in my transition bag and I felt very full. Cycling is not my strong point, so at this point, I decided the race was not so much a race, but more of a fun day. I changed out of my wetsuit and lined up for the time trial start, which was a rolling start based on your bib number. It was pretty cool to watch the professionals start their bike.

The bike course consists of rolling hills with endless views of vineyards, estates and tasting rooms. It was beautiful. I’m kind of glad I took the time to enjoy the scenery. The ride went by pretty fast, but I was wondering about the run in the back of my mind. I had no idea if I was going to be able to run 13.1 miles.

Transition was in downtown Santa Rosa and went very smooth. The run course is two loops out and back on a greenway leading around and then away from downtown and it was mostly flat. The run was pretty warm, not much shade and provided varying surfaces to run. It was very similar to the ATT in some sections. I started running out of transition and surprising my hamstring/hip felt ok but I knew that wouldn’t last long. I decided to find a pace that was comfortable and see how long I could hold it. While running, I made a new friend from San Diego. It was her 50th birthday and she was doing her first 70.3. She is a runner who just learned how to swim. Amazing! Once I started the second loop, the course became crowded. However, it provided opportunities to see my friends who were racing and that was a big boost! It was also super awesome to see the professionals running at blazing speeds and cheer them on! My hamstring tightened up around mile 11 and I spent the last few miles talking to my leg asking it to not fully cramp and just finish the race. I also had some stomach issue most likely from all the snacks I nervously consumed during the delayed start. In the end, I finished. Not my worst race, but far from the best. Most importantly, it was FUN!

After the race I got to meet Mirinda Carfrae! Highlight of the day for sure!

In the end, it was a little disappointing to not actually do a triathlon, but it was great day and trip with friends! I’m going back to Santa Rosa one day for the full 70.3 and more wine!

Thanks for reading!

Lindsey M.